Beha-alotkha and Shemot: Moses as Wet Nurse

DAILY DEVOTIONAL

by Pastor Larry Stockstill

When grown men run, something urgent has caused them to abandon their usual dignity. Ahimaaz’s zeal to run was inspired by his joy at being the one to report a victory to his king (2 Samuel 18:28). In the New Testament, Peter and John ran at the thought of the resurrection (John 20:4). When we have an important message to deliver, we, too, will run. 

When news so wonderful grips the soul, the usual pace of life is interrupted, and a walk becomes a run. Those who do not know the Lord may not understand your zeal to run with the good news of the Gospel, but they do not hesitate to run for what they are excited about. You need to ask God to quicken your pace of testimony, to thrill your heart with His Word so that a walk just won’t do. 

If you have lost your zeal, come back to the empty tomb today and look in. Then run to the waiting nations with your report. Remember what Jesus said when He appeared to His disciples following His resurrection: “As the Father has sent me, so I send you” (John 20:21).

torahsparks

Moses never wanted the job.

When God spoke out of the burning bush and assigned him to lead the Israelites out of Egypt, Moses tried to get out of it.  He objected:

Moses at the Burning Bush by Rembrandt van Rijn Moses at the Burning Bush
by Rembrandt van Rijn

Hey! Lo ya-aminu me, and they will not listen to my voice, for they will say: Your god, God, did not appear. (Exodus 4:1)

Lo ya-aminu = They will not believe, they will not trust.  Lo (לֹא) = not.  Ya-aminu (יַאֲמִינוּ) = They will believe, be convinced by, put trust in, have faith in.  (From the root aman, אמן, which is also the root of amen (אָמֵן) = a solemn statement of confirmation or acceptance.  See last week’s post, Naso: Ordeal of Trust for the first use of “Amen” in the Torah.)

God gave Moses three miraculous signs to convince the Israelites that he…

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